Travels in pottery

Arriving back in the studio after a substantial time away in various parts of Asia, I thought I’d post up a little taste of the visual plenty from the trip, starting with of one of my favourite places – Bhaktapur.

This town in Nepal is a mediaeval city with a very strong artisanal tradition and a charming and laidback approach to life. Only an hour from the craziness of Kathmandu, Bhaktapur is full of friendliness and a lively traditional, and very visible, culture. It’s a Newari city and it has it’s own special caste of potters – the Prajapatis. Historically this was a very low caste but it was heartening to meet young potters raising their heads high and proudly continuing their traditional heritage for a new era. By embracing social media, finding out about new techniques and researching new niches in their business they are moving away from occupying a challenging strata of society as the demand for simple bisque-fired, purely functional, single-use pots slowly dwindles. Below is an example of a traditional urn, situated on a street-corner sitting area:

Bhaktapur ancient pot

I had the privilege of watching and engaging with a remarkable master potter too. His ‘studio’ is simply an unsheltered area of a backstreet off Potters’ Square, next to some rudimentary storage space for his goods and materials. He works in the traditional style, throwing functional homewares such as rakshi brewing apparatus as well as myriad moneyboxes, as seen below – each of these pots is thrown in less than a minute on his huge momentum wheel, which is simply stirred into action with a wooden staff:

master at work

Pots drying in the square – these are for the local market and are functional pots for use in the home:

drying in potters square

Here a potter tends to one of the wood-fired kilns, before getting ready for the next firing. In preparation, women file through the square bearing huge bundles of straw to pack around the pots. Beneath is a shot of a kiln ready to fire. How the whole district doesn’t go up in flames I have no idea:wood firingready to fire

Pots of yoghurt stacked in a traditional curd shop. A buffalo milk delicacy, cooling earthenware bowls are still the preferred vessels to sell in – sadly they are discarded after use:

curd bowls

Below are some more shots of the square. You can see the huge stack of straw ready to be transported to the kiln firing buildings; pots ready for sale; pots drying out in the sun, each maker arranging them in a perfect grid of work; there is even pottery graffiti on a wall as you enter the Potter’s Square:

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I would love to spend more time here and feel the whole process from start to finish and speak to more of the traditional artisans still at work.

Acer Bowl in Ceramic Review

earthenware bowls lores

So excited to see my acer serving bowl gracing the page of Ceramic Review this issue. Such a shock I nearly dropped my coffee! It’s featured in an advertorial for the British Craft Trade Fair which I’m taking part in next month. So pleased, it’s a new design in my hand painted and sgraffito decorated earthenware range.

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Brand New Doily Ware

Particularly pleased with the treasure I found in the kiln this morning…

new doily bowlThis is a new colourway and vintage lace design that I’ve been trialling for my ever-popular Doily Ware range.  The tactile smooth porcelain with it’s warped curves goes beautifully with the intricacy of this hand made lace. Colours include pure cobalt and copper oxides as well as a limited palette of carefully chosen underglaze colours. Shown below is the doily mug and large bowl, with a cobalt blue doily jug using the classic striking vintage lace pattern. I think they complement well.new doily ware 1 Continue reading

Summer Market Season 2014

Come along to a summer fair and meet the artist, see all the lovely As the Crow Flies ceramics and home wares for yourself! Find out where:

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