Volcanic Yellow

I’ve been inspired for a while to try and create a sulphurous yellow glaze as I am a bit mad for yellow at the moment. I’ve also been working hard at throwing porcelain for my illustrated range – but felt it was time to try something a little different that relies simply on the surface effects and colour of the vessels in relation to the thrown shapes and the qualities of the material.

I completed a small body of work using some new glazes before going on sabbatical earlier this year and felt really pleased with how they came out of the kiln:

volcanic yellow four pieces

Volcanic Yellow collection in the studio.

I took the pots to Frome artisan market this month, selling out before I’d even had a chance to take any proper product shots! I must admit I was quite surprised at the level of positivity to them. Here are a few shots of them before they went:

volcanic yellow 1 lo

Volcanic Yellow on display a the Frome Independent market.

base of volcanic yellow lo

Logo-ed base of Volcanic Yellow mug

I’m really looking forward to getting back into the studio now and developing this range further – I’ve already thrown a new shape of jug to play with. Shown below, they are just now drying out ready for bisque firing. Maybe it will be part of the new Volcanic Yellow range, or maybe an illustrated piece, I will be test-firing a few different ideas:

new jugs lo

 

Travels in pottery

Arriving back in the studio after a substantial time away in various parts of Asia, I thought I’d post up a little taste of the visual plenty from the trip, starting with of one of my favourite places – Bhaktapur.

This town in Nepal is a mediaeval city with a very strong artisanal tradition and a charming and laidback approach to life. Only an hour from the craziness of Kathmandu, Bhaktapur is full of friendliness and a lively traditional, and very visible, culture. It’s a Newari city and it has it’s own special caste of potters – the Prajapatis. Historically this was a very low caste but it was heartening to meet young potters raising their heads high and proudly continuing their traditional heritage for a new era. By embracing social media, finding out about new techniques and researching new niches in their business they are moving away from occupying a challenging strata of society as the demand for simple bisque-fired, purely functional, single-use pots slowly dwindles. Below is an example of a traditional urn, situated on a street-corner sitting area:

Bhaktapur ancient pot

I had the privilege of watching and engaging with a remarkable master potter too. His ‘studio’ is simply an unsheltered area of a backstreet off Potters’ Square, next to some rudimentary storage space for his goods and materials. He works in the traditional style, throwing functional homewares such as rakshi brewing apparatus as well as myriad moneyboxes, as seen below – each of these pots is thrown in less than a minute on his huge momentum wheel, which is simply stirred into action with a wooden staff:

master at work

Pots drying in the square – these are for the local market and are functional pots for use in the home:

drying in potters square

Here a potter tends to one of the wood-fired kilns, before getting ready for the next firing. In preparation, women file through the square bearing huge bundles of straw to pack around the pots. Beneath is a shot of a kiln ready to fire. How the whole district doesn’t go up in flames I have no idea:wood firingready to fire

Pots of yoghurt stacked in a traditional curd shop. A buffalo milk delicacy, cooling earthenware bowls are still the preferred vessels to sell in – sadly they are discarded after use:

curd bowls

Below are some more shots of the square. You can see the huge stack of straw ready to be transported to the kiln firing buildings; pots ready for sale; pots drying out in the sun, each maker arranging them in a perfect grid of work; there is even pottery graffiti on a wall as you enter the Potter’s Square:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I would love to spend more time here and feel the whole process from start to finish and speak to more of the traditional artisans still at work.

Adventures in Porcelain

January and February…the fairs are over, the festivities finished and the earth is hibernating and readying itself for germination. Much the same stage has been reflected here at As the Crow Flies. A really valuable period of reflective thought, sketching ideas, drawing on the ideas touch on in 2015 and pushing them further.

I’ve really enjoyed the chance to process carefully the throwing aims I’ve had, working towards cleaner shapes in porcelain, practising the motions of throwing and enjoying the smooth clean feel of porcelain after working in terracotta for so long. First out of the initial test firing was a Wild Pea serving bowl:

6 large wild pea bowl .jpg

Seeing the initial effects coming out on a few pieces enabled me to refine and progress the ideas…gradually more things came out of the kiln, building the bones of a new range of Dandelion and Wild Pea shapes; some of which are pictured below:

9 wild peas and dandelions7 wild pea large mug8 new bowls

I’m also pleased to have produced more satisfying wine tumblers and the first forays into vase production, but photos of these will have to come later. The final thing I played with was transposing my popular Nasturtium design from terracotta to porcelain – in tea cup form. Looking very Art Deco with it’s conical shape, I particularly like this example:

nasturtium tea cup

All in all, I feel ready for this year…although I’ll have to put my anticipation on hold for a little while as I am taking a sabbatical from mid-March to mid-July to walk through Mustang in the Himalayas and then cycle the through the Pamirs in Tajikistan up into Kyrgyzstan. I’m sure the inspiration will be myriad so I look forward to posting when I get back.

Stroud Goodwill

This winter in Stroud has been a lovely one – ATCF has been gracing the main square at the Farmers’ Market over a few dates in the lead up to Christmas, culminating in last weekend at the Goodwill Evening on Friday 4th and the Produce Market on Sat 5th. Thanks to the market team and all my lovely customers in Stroud – it’s been well worth the effort of foraying out from Bristol.

Had an entertaining moment at the Goodwill Evening when a photographer from Stroud News and Journal stopped by to comment on how unusual the wares were and feature me in his pictorial of the evening. Thanks to photographer Simon Pizzey who took the time to stop for this shot:

stroud news goodwill evening dec42015

As the Crow Flies will be back up in Stroud for some markets later on in 2016.

South Bristol Arts Trail

Really looking forward to this event on Sat 16th – Sun17th May! Our venue is going to be absolutely amazing… As the Crow Flies will be taking over the kitchen space with ceramics, illustration and home wares. Fuller maps will be exhibiting their utterly unique and brilliant map artworks of Bristol and beyond in the print room. Esther Curtis designs will be creating a lovely ambience with her beautiful graphics at the front of the house where you may be lucky enough to get a mini massage treatment from our lovely hostess Sam Lacey… all in all it’s going to be a complete sensory experience.

big mugs loAbove: As the Crow Flies illustrated bone china mugs © As the Crow Flies.

gareth mapAbove: a tiny snippet of the incredibly intricate Bristol Map, as featured on the BBC © Fuller Maps. Below: graphic illustration © Esther Curtis.

esther curtis

We’ll be showing at 17 Ashton Gate Terrace, Southville, BS3 1TA so come along and find us. Follow the links below to find out about the other artists at the venue:

Sam Lacey – holistic massage therapist: 

www.relaxrestorerevive.com
https://www.facebook.com/RelaxRestoreRevive

 

Fuller Maps original artworks:

Fuller Maps

Esther Curtis design:

http://esthercurtisdesign.blogspot.co.uk

Find out more about the trail here: http://www.southbankbristolarts.co.uk/

Partridges in a Pear Tree…

So, shortly I’ll be unveiling some new designs at the British Craft Trade Fair event in Harrogate next month. My partridges are now busy getting sampled as tea towels and new mug transfers, which I’ll hope to be firing onto some bone china just in time to pack them off! Here is a sneaky peak at what they will be looking like…

pinky colours retro colours

 

Above are two sets of mug designs – English partridges under a pear tree, and french partridges in a chorus line, how apt.  Tea towels will be in a two-colour screenprint in vibrant burnt orange and viridian, while the mugs I’m sampling in a retro ochre palette and a more jubilant magenta palette. We shall see what hits the spot when they’re ready in a week or two…

New Inspirations – Tree Themes

10390038_10152323059957133_2866024385991924260_nPleased with the work-in-progress on a new range of hand-illustrated earthenware… It’s my favourite way of working and I was thrilled to be commissioned by a good friend to produce Christmas presents for her extended family featuring favourite trees. The pictures here show work in the green ware stage – at present they are in the kiln cooling after their first bisque firing and will be glazed by the end of the week – must remember and post up some photos of the final pieces! Maple, Oak and Beech feature on these pieces, with some hidden personalisations such as imprints of leaves from family gardens inside the mugs.10610717_10152323309352133_3436202340150921515_n 10730999_10152323061527133_8483336425447139595_n 10734214_10152323062652133_6369216000558981153_n 10744022_10152323333202133_757224287_o image006

Hand Painted Porcelain Cufflinks

Introducing a fine new range of rather jaunty hand made and hand painted porcelain and antiqued brass cufflinks…

10553469_908420602505015_1744850935811353932_n

Continue reading

Mr Peacock Legs

Introducing the fabulous Mr Peacock Legs mug… Designed to fit in with the fabulous Peacock Tea Towel already in the As the Crow Flies home ware range, Mr Peacock Legs comes in several different guises. In the larger size (9.2cm high x 8.5 cm diameter), you can choose from a black or the new summer magenta version; each one is printed front and back with hand-applied decals, plus playful gangly legs dangling on the inner rims. The magenta version also has his name inscribed in scroll script on the outside. What’s not to like, as they say?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Continue reading